Rosé happens when the skins of red grapes touch wine for only a short time. Where some red wines ferment for weeks at a time on red grape skins, rosé wines are stained red for just a few hours. The winemaker has complete control over the color of the wine, and removes the red grape skins (the source of the red pigment) when the wine reaches the perfect color. As you can imagine, nearly any red wine grape (from Cabernet Sauvignon to Syrah) can be used to make rosé wine, however there are several common styles and grapes that are preferred for rosé.

 




 

What Does Rosé Taste Like?
 

Rosé's flavor profile is fresh and fruity. Think a light red, like grenache, with some extra brightness and crispness.
 

Expect the following flavors when you take a sip:
 

    Red fruits like strawberries, cherries, and raspberries
    Flowers
    Citrus
    Melon
    Celery
 

Each type of rosé will taste slightly different based on the type of grapes used to produce it, ranging from savory to dry to sweet.

 



 

 

It’s not hard to see why rosé is so popular — this pink wine isn’t just a light, refreshing, and fruity summer staple, but it’s also the perfect choice for year-round sipping.
 

Although it’s been around for centuries, this blush-colored favorite is having a moment that has much to do with its eye-catching hue as it does its versatility and taste.
 

Contrary to popular belief, rosé isn’t just a sweet wine. Depending on which type of red grapes are used, it can be on the fruity or dry side. As for food pairing, rosé holds up to savory, rich dishes as well as light and fruity flavors. Whether you enjoy it dry or sweet, paired with food or sipped solo, there’s one thing that most of us can agree on: a chilled rosé is sheer bliss in a bottle.|