The blending method is when a little bit of red wine is added to a vat of white wine to make rosé. It doesn’t take much red wine to dye a white wine pink, so usually these wines will have up to 5% or so, of a red wine added. This method is very uncommon with still rosé wines but happens much more in sparkling wine regions such as Champagne. An example of a very fine wine made with this technique is Ruinart’s rosé Champagne, which is primarily Chardonnay with a smidgen of red Pinot Noir blended in.

 




 



Rosé wines can be made still, semi-sparkling or sparkling and with a wide range of sweetness levels from highly dry Provençal rosé to sweet White Zinfandels and blushes. Rosé wines are made from a wide variety of grapes and can be found all around the globe.

 

 

 

It’s not hard to see why rosé is so popular — this pink wine isn’t just a light, refreshing, and fruity summer staple, but it’s also the perfect choice for year-round sipping.
 

Although it’s been around for centuries, this blush-colored favorite is having a moment that has much to do with its eye-catching hue as it does its versatility and taste.
 

Contrary to popular belief, rosé isn’t just a sweet wine. Depending on which type of red grapes are used, it can be on the fruity or dry side. As for food pairing, rosé holds up to savory, rich dishes as well as light and fruity flavors. Whether you enjoy it dry or sweet, paired with food or sipped solo, there’s one thing that most of us can agree on: a chilled rosé is sheer bliss in a bottle.|