The primary flavors of rosé wine are red fruit, flowers, citrus, and melon, with a pleasant crunchy green flavor on the finish similar to celery or rhubarb. Of course, depending on the type of grape the rosé wine is made with will greatly vary the flavor. For example, a deeply-colored Italian Aglianico rosé–rosé is called “Rosato” in Italy,– will offer up cherry and orange zest flavors, and a pale-colored Grenache rosé from Provence in France will taste of honeydew melon, lemon and celery. 
 

 


 

 

 


Rosé is a wine with surprising nuance that encompasses impressive traditions in some of Europe’s great appellations. However, it’s not so complex that it’s intimidating to learn the basics. Rosé is the fastest-growing category in America, as consumption grew roughly 50% in 2017. Consequently, you’ll likely see more choices on shelves as summer nears.

 

 

 

It’s not hard to see why rosé is so popular — this pink wine isn’t just a light, refreshing, and fruity summer staple, but it’s also the perfect choice for year-round sipping.
 

Although it’s been around for centuries, this blush-colored favorite is having a moment that has much to do with its eye-catching hue as it does its versatility and taste.
 

Contrary to popular belief, rosé isn’t just a sweet wine. Depending on which type of red grapes are used, it can be on the fruity or dry side. As for food pairing, rosé holds up to savory, rich dishes as well as light and fruity flavors. Whether you enjoy it dry or sweet, paired with food or sipped solo, there’s one thing that most of us can agree on: a chilled rosé is sheer bliss in a bottle.|